UnBroken

I had finally finished reading Unbroken. I took so long, but it is very powerful. Towards the end, I felt dizzy and drained from reading it. I don’t know why. This book made me think about humanity, the orders of life, God, the value of death, love and freedom and peace. Just everything was summed up in a man’s story. I’m speechless. His will for survival, the families’ longings, even things told from the Bird’s perspective, and his mother’s perspective gave me a fresh understanding; but most importantly, the power of forgiveness at the end of the book amazed me.

The horrors of war are unimaginable. They pushed men to their limits, stripping every bit of humanism, dignity, and strength in them. Chapter thirty-eight was my absolute favorite. It sums up God reaching into the world through miracles and the intangible blessings that give men the strength to outlast their sorrows. 

The crazy circumstances and unfairness of war infuriated me. I stayed up all night, thinking about how sometimes, things are so meaningless. Louie wrote a letter of forgiveness to his tormentor, nicknamed the Bird, and got neither a reply nor any news. Some parents wait their whole lives for their children to come home, only to realize they were dead. Some POWs prayed and endured, but were all mass executed in the end. Nobody knew who they were, and I’m sure there are many acts of heroism that they did that was left unfeatured. What is this? How can life end so abruptly, and without recognition?

We have so many questions to ask in our own lives. I’m sure they have so many questions too. Question when’s the end of their suffering, question when will they be liberated, get the answers they need. I have a lot of questions. I want to believe I’m destined for great things, and God placed the burden in my heart for a reason. But I guess all the POWs who died, they’ll like to believe they can do greater things too. I don’t know. I like the fact that this is a true story. You know what’s the difference between fictional books and this? Heros die here. Heros don’t find closure and answers in real life before they die, and that’s a hell of a disturbing thought.

“The Bible teaches that we are to be patient in suffering. That’s the hardest thing of all, to be patient, to have songs in the night. Tears become telescopes to heaven, bringing eternity a little closer.”

My favorite quote. I admit I do need time. A lot of time. I do have a lot of learning curves. I wish I could say I’m excited in the years to come, I’m excited about the extraordinary things God would do in my life, but not now. I wouldn’t say I’m demoralized though. I just think I want the years to come because I want it to be over, I am curious about how God would work things out, but I know it is not my job to guess what God’s will is for me now. It is incomprehensible, and we should just trust Him.

Didn’t even wait till I finished the book to rate it 5 stars on Goodreads. If there’s only one book you must read in your life, I’d say read this.

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